Total Pageviews

Jan 22, 2018

Bird rescues bird

                                                                                  Photo byTed Bird

SStarling stuck in Schombergg
My long-time friend, Ted Bird, of Schomberg, discovered a Starling, (pictured above), trapped in a birdseed feeder on his backyard deck, a day or so ago.   How it got into the feeder is a mystery, but Ted says it was easily released.  This is a simple reminder of the winter-feeding imperative of our feathered friends.
Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder 

Jan 21, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds - 17

 Photos by Geoff Simpson  
Sharp-shinned Hawk
(Accipiter striatus)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 20, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds ~ 16


Photos by BarrytheBirder
RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH
(Sitta canadensis)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 19, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds - 15

Photos by BarrytheBirder
White-breasted Nuthatch
(Sitta Carolinensis)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 18, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds - 14

 Photos by BarrytheBirder
SNOWY OWL
(Bubo scandiacus)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 17, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds - 13

 Photos by Barry Wallace
RED-TAILED HAWK
(Buteo jamaicensis)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 16, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds - 12

 Photos by BarrytheBirder
TRUMPETER SWAN
(Cygnus buccinator)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 15, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds - 11

 Photos by BarrytheBirder
WILD TURKEY
( Meleagris gallopavo)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 14, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds ~10

 Photos by Barry theBirder
American Tree Sparrow
(Spizella arborea


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 13, 2018

On Canada's West Coast...

Photos by Bob Kemp
What a treat to receive photos from my British Columbia friend, Bob Kemp, during the bitterly cold recent days in southern Ontario.   His photos include the the Steller's Jay, at top; the Anna's Hummingbird, below; then the Northern Shoveler Duck , and at the bottom, a group of Green-winged Teals.   I hope Bob's photos take some of the deep January chill out of your day.




Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 12, 2018

2-day thaw suits this possum

Photo by Barry Wallace
A bitter cold late December and early January finally broke for a couple of days and brought this opossum out for a day to check on the seeds around the bird feeders.   He or she didn't hang around for long however.
Please comment if you wish.
Barry Wallace  

Jan 9, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds ~ 9

Photos by BarrytheBirder 
Snow Bunting
(Plectrophenax nivalis)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 8, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds - 8


Photos by Barry Wallace
VARIED THRUSH
(Ixoreus naevius)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 7, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds ~ 7


Photos by BarrytheBirder
BLUE JAY
(Cyanocitta cristata)



Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 6, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds - 6


Photos by BarrytheBirder
Chipping Sparrow
(Spizella passerina)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 5, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds ~ 5

 Photos by Barry Wallace
Mourning Dove
(Zenaida macroura)


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 4, 2018

Ontaerio Winter Birds ~ 4


     
                                                                     Photos by BarrytheBirder
American Goldfinch
(Carduelis tristis) 


Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 3, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds ~ 3

 Photos by Barry Wallace
Black-capped Chickadee
(Poecile atricapillus)





















Please comment if you wish.
Photo by BarrytheBirder


Jan 2, 2018

Ontario Winter Birds ~ 2

 Photos by Barry Wallace
Dark-eyed Junco
Junco Hyemalis


Male
Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Jan 1, 2018

Ontario Winter birds ~ 1

 Photos by BarrytheBirder

Northern Cardinal
(Cardinalis cardinalis)
MALE






















FEMALE

Please comment if you wish.
Barry the Birder



Dec 15, 2017

Strange call from Babblers



Photo: Chris Tzaroz / Birdlife Australia
GRAY-CROWNED BABBLER
(Pomatostomus temporalis)
The noisy, chattering call of the Gray-crowned Babbler readily announces its presence, but the most well-known call is a distinct 'yahoo', given as a duet by pairs of birds.  Females give a harsh 'ya' and males reply with a high-pitched 'hoo', but given the perfect timing it sounds as though the combined call has been given by a solitary bird.  Tricky devils.

Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Dec 13, 2017

Birds & Birders ~ Pax Vobiscum


                                                                                                                    Photo by BarrytheBirder
Purple Finch
(Carpodacus purpureus)

Christmas waves a magic wand
Over the world, and behold, 
Everything is softer 
And more beautiful.
                                                                - Norman Vincent Peale

BEST WISHES TO ALL

Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Dec 7, 2017

Loves to startle birders who get too close...


Photo by Robert Shantz / Alamy
MONTEZUMA QUAIL
(Crytonyx montezumae)
The Montezuma Quail is native to the south-west US and the northern mountains of Mexico.   It is also known as the Mearn's Quail, Harlequin Quail and the Fool Quail.   The Fool Quail name is because of its behaviour, which includes crouching motionless until being practically stepped upon before exploding straight up into noisily whirring flight.
Please comment if you wish.
BarytheBirder

Dec 6, 2017

Halcyon smyrnensis

Photo: Alaa Badarneh / EPA
White-throated Kingfisher
The White-throated Kingfisher is one of over 80 species of Kingfishers in the world.   This particular species is native to southern Asia and Phillipines.   In the photo above, a White-Throated Kingfisher is seen eating a snake, near the West Bank city of Nablus, in occupied Palestine.
Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder 

Dec 5, 2017

Neonicotinoids make birds lose their way


 Photos by BarrytheBirder                     


An experimental research study is the first to directly show harm to songbirds, extending the known impacts of neonicotinoids beyond insects.   This has been reported by Damian Carrington, Environment Editor of The Guardian.   The world's most widely used insecticide may cause migrating songbirds to lose their sense of direction and suffer drastic weight loss, according to new research.   The work is significant because it is the first direct evidence that neonicotinoids can harm songbirds and their migration.   Farmland birds have declined drastically in North America in recent decades and pesticides have long been suspected of playing a role.   The first evidence came in 2014 when a study in Holland found bird populations fell most sharply in areas where neonicotinoid pollution was highest.   Three neonicotinoids were banned from use on flowering crops in the European Union in 2013 due to unacceptable risks to bees and other pollinators and a total outdoor ban is being considered.   Now Canada is considering a similar ban.   The research analysed the effect of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid on White-crowned Sparrows, as pictured here, that migrate from the southern US and Mexico to northern Canada in summer.   Birds were given doses equivalent to less than a single corn seed and within hours became weak, developed stomach problems and stopped eating.    They quickly lost 17-25% of their weight and were unable to identify the northward direction of their migration.   Professor Christy Morrissey, at the University of Saskachewan says seed sowing coincides with when birds are migrating north, exposing them to harm.  They (the pesticides) are applied in spring which overlaps exactly the time when they are moving north and are stopping   in agricultural fields to refuel along their way.
        
                                                                                                       

Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Dec 4, 2017

Ibis (Ibises - plural)

Photo: Ofer Levi
Australian White Ibis 
( Threskiornis molluca )
Pictured above is an Australian White Ibis, one of 28 Ibis species in the world (plus there are two more extinct).   The Australian White Ibis is one the bird species running for Australian Bird of the Year 2017.

Photo: Goran Bogicevic
Please comment if you wish.
BarrytheBirder

Dec 3, 2017

Well-camouflaged woodpecker

Photo:George Reszeter / Alamy Stock Photo
GREEN IBERIAN WOODPECKER
 (Picus viridis sharpei)

A male Green Iberian Woodpecker (above) bathes in a 
woodland pond, watched by a pair
of Ring-necked 
Pheasants.

Please comment 
if you wish.
BarrytheBirder


    
 Photo: Carlos N. Bocos